Awesome Things From History

Awesome Things From History Because I am obsessed with history and have way too much time on my hands.

Underground Map Reveals Hidden Secrets Of Stonehenge And Nearby Monstrous "Super Henge" | IFLScience

Hiatus! Sort of…

Hey everybody, you may have noticed that I’ve been posting very little recently.  This is because I’m in the last couple weeks of grad school and have been working on finishing up my dissertation.  So until October I’m not going to be around much.  I might try and queue some posts, who knows.

Thanks for bearing with me!

mediumaevum:

The first page of the Codex Wallerstein shows the typical arms of 15th-century individual combat, including the longsword, rondel dagger, sword-and-buckler, halberd, spear and staff.

Reblogged from mediumaevum

mediumaevum:

The first page of the Codex Wallerstein shows the typical arms of 15th-century individual combat, including the longswordrondel daggersword-and-bucklerhalberdspear and staff.

usnatarchives:

Meet Mary Tippee, or Mary Tebe, a vivandere with the 114th Pennsylvania Infantry, whose unit was led by Collis Zouaves. Women in this position were responsible for working in canteens and carrying water, brandy, or wine for the soldiers. In traditional vivandere fashion, Tippee is pictured wearing the uniform of her company, with a knee-length skirt over the men’s pants. Ca. 1863. Attributed to Charles J. and Isaac G. Tyson. Tipton Collection. National Archives Identifier: 520205

Reblogged from usnatarchives

usnatarchives:

Meet Mary Tippee, or Mary Tebe, a vivandere with the 114th Pennsylvania Infantry, whose unit was led by Collis Zouaves. Women in this position were responsible for working in canteens and carrying water, brandy, or wine for the soldiers. In traditional vivandere fashion, Tippee is pictured wearing the uniform of her company, with a knee-length skirt over the men’s pants. Ca. 1863. Attributed to Charles J. and Isaac G. Tyson. Tipton Collection. National Archives Identifier: 520205

mediumaevum:

Lady dinosaur in Victorian London made me wonder about fossils during the Middle Ages. They were found and discussed, as early as Aristotle, and later Ibn Sina and Albert of Saxony. By the XVI century, extensive collections were gathered and classified.
This one, in particular, is a fossilized mammoth bone, gift by Emperor Frederick III to the St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna in 1443.

Reblogged from talesofthedragonslayer

mediumaevum:

Lady dinosaur in Victorian London made me wonder about fossils during the Middle Ages. They were found and discussed, as early as Aristotle, and later Ibn Sina and Albert of Saxony. By the XVI century, extensive collections were gathered and classified.

This one, in particular, is a fossilized mammoth bone, gift by Emperor Frederick III to the St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna in 1443.

(Source: peter-diem.at)

How guys tried to pick up girls in the 18th century

Reblogged from fuckyeaheuropeanhistory

(Source: historybizarre)

usnatarchives:

Benjamin Lincoln was an American army officer who served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He is notable for his involvement in three major surrenders during the war: Battle of Saratoga, 1780 Siege of Charleston, and the British surrender at Yorktown. The sword Lincoln is sporting is depicted in typical army officers’ fashion. Army officers typically carried two different swords. One is used for full dress—mostly ceremonial in character, as in this picture—and the other used primarily in hand-to-hand combat. National Archives Identifier: 530962

Reblogged from usnatarchives

usnatarchives:

Benjamin Lincoln was an American army officer who served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He is notable for his involvement in three major surrenders during the war: Battle of Saratoga, 1780 Siege of Charleston, and the British surrender at Yorktown. The sword Lincoln is sporting is depicted in typical army officers’ fashion. Army officers typically carried two different swords. One is used for full dress—mostly ceremonial in character, as in this picture—and the other used primarily in hand-to-hand combat. National Archives Identifier: 530962

coolchicksfromhistory:

Christine de Pizan (1364- c. 1430)
Art by April Babcock (tumblr)
Christine de Pizan is one of the best known writers of the medieval period, yet if not for circumstances beyond her control she might never have picked up a pen.  The daughter of an Italian scientist at the court of Charles V of France, Christine was given a classical education before her marriage at the age of fifteen to a royal secretary named Etienne du Castel.  When she was 25, her beloved husband died in an epidemic.  As her father had already passed away, Christine found herself responsible for the care of not only herself and her two children, but also her mother and an orphaned niece.
Christine began writing love ballads that caught the attention of wealthy patrons who enjoyed both her poetry and the novelty of a female writer.  Christine wrote hundreds of poems, many on commission for specific nobles, and this work allowed her to support her family and clear the debts left after her husband’s death.
Christine’s most famous work, The Book of the City of Ladies (1405), is an impassioned defense of women.  It challenged misogyny by creating a symbolic city of righteous women.  The women profiled include historical figures such as Zenobia and Sappho, pagan goddesses such as Isis and Minerva, women from the Hebrew Bible such as Deborah and the unnamed Woman of Valor (Proverbs 31), and Christian saints such as the Virgin Mary and St. Lucy.  Christine’s book was a testimony to the accomplishments of women and argued for wider access to education for women. 
While The Book of the City of Ladies is primarily about female achievement, Christine also included an anti-rape message.  As a character in the book, Christine says “I am therefore troubled and grieved when men argue that many women want to be raped and that it does not bother them at all to be raped by men even when they verbally protest…”  Lady Rectitude, one of Christine’s guides in The Book of the City of Ladies, responds “Rest assured, dear friend, chaste ladies who live honestly take absolutely no pleasure in being raped. Indeed, rape is the greatest possible sorrow for them. Many upright women have demonstrated that this is true with their own credible examples…”
In 1418, Christine retired to a convent in Poissy.  At the convent she wrote one final poem which she dedicated to Joan of Arc.  It is the only known French language work about Joan of Arc written during Joan’s lifetime.

Reblogged from frenchhistory

coolchicksfromhistory:

Christine de Pizan (1364- c. 1430)

Art by April Babcock (tumblr)

Christine de Pizan is one of the best known writers of the medieval period, yet if not for circumstances beyond her control she might never have picked up a pen.  The daughter of an Italian scientist at the court of Charles V of France, Christine was given a classical education before her marriage at the age of fifteen to a royal secretary named Etienne du Castel.  When she was 25, her beloved husband died in an epidemic.  As her father had already passed away, Christine found herself responsible for the care of not only herself and her two children, but also her mother and an orphaned niece.

Christine began writing love ballads that caught the attention of wealthy patrons who enjoyed both her poetry and the novelty of a female writer.  Christine wrote hundreds of poems, many on commission for specific nobles, and this work allowed her to support her family and clear the debts left after her husband’s death.

Christine’s most famous work, The Book of the City of Ladies (1405), is an impassioned defense of women.  It challenged misogyny by creating a symbolic city of righteous women.  The women profiled include historical figures such as Zenobia and Sappho, pagan goddesses such as Isis and Minerva, women from the Hebrew Bible such as Deborah and the unnamed Woman of Valor (Proverbs 31), and Christian saints such as the Virgin Mary and St. Lucy.  Christine’s book was a testimony to the accomplishments of women and argued for wider access to education for women. 

While The Book of the City of Ladies is primarily about female achievement, Christine also included an anti-rape message.  As a character in the book, Christine says “I am therefore troubled and grieved when men argue that many women want to be raped and that it does not bother them at all to be raped by men even when they verbally protest…”  Lady Rectitude, one of Christine’s guides in The Book of the City of Ladies, responds “Rest assured, dear friend, chaste ladies who live honestly take absolutely no pleasure in being raped. Indeed, rape is the greatest possible sorrow for them. Many upright women have demonstrated that this is true with their own credible examples…”

In 1418, Christine retired to a convent in Poissy.  At the convent she wrote one final poem which she dedicated to Joan of Arc.  It is the only known French language work about Joan of Arc written during Joan’s lifetime.

thebrainscoop:

This is a 500 million year old fossilized meteorite excavated from a limestone quarry in Sweden. Only about 101 are known to exist, but their rarity isn’t surprising: they crash-landed on Earth about 270 million years before the dinosaurs evolved. 

Reblogged from thebrainscoop

thebrainscoop:

This is a 500 million year old fossilized meteorite excavated from a limestone quarry in Sweden. Only about 101 are known to exist, but their rarity isn’t surprising: they crash-landed on Earth about 270 million years before the dinosaurs evolved. 

historicaltimes:

Benjamin Baker illustrating the structural principles of suspended span cantilever bridges - dated between 1882~1904

Reblogged from beatonna

historicaltimes:

Benjamin Baker illustrating the structural principles of suspended span cantilever bridges - dated between 1882~1904