Awesome Things From History

Awesome Things From History Because I am obsessed with history and have way too much time on my hands.

japaneseaesthetics:

Two Gallinules and Lotus Leaves in Shallow Water in the Rain.  Woodblock print, 20th century, Japan, by artist Soseki. 
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of C. Adrian Rübel
, 1978.417

Reblogged from asianhistory

japaneseaesthetics:

Two Gallinules and Lotus Leaves in Shallow Water in the Rain.  Woodblock print, 20th century, Japan, by artist Soseki. 

Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of C. Adrian Rübel

, 1978.417

(Source: harvardartmuseums.org)

"He really had been through death, but he had returned because he could not bear the solitude."

Reblogged from mediumaevum

 Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez (1927-2014)One Hundred Years of Solitude (via mediumaevum)

mediumaevum:

Beginning at sundown on April 14, many Jews observed Passover at a Seder, the special meal that commemorates their ancestors’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the haggadah. The Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is kept, is a rare, beautifully illustrated manuscript created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its own story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus.
Watch the PBS documentary on this extraordinary manuscript, a survivor of the 1492 expulsion of the Jews from Spain, two world wars, and the four-year seige of the city of Sarajevo (1992-1996).

Reblogged from mediumaevum

mediumaevum:

Beginning at sundown on April 14, many Jews observed Passover at a Seder, the special meal that commemorates their ancestors’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the haggadah. The Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is kept, is a rare, beautifully illustrated manuscript created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its own story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus.

Watch the PBS documentary on this extraordinary manuscript, a survivor of the 1492 expulsion of the Jews from Spain, two world wars, and the four-year seige of the city of Sarajevo (1992-1996).

british-history:

An armed contingent of French forces attempted to invade the Isle of Wight on this day in British history, 21 July 1545. The French invasion was repelled at heavy cost to the British militia raised to defend the island. This occasion was the last time that France attempted to attack the Isle of Wight.

Reblogged from frenchhistory

british-history:

An armed contingent of French forces attempted to invade the Isle of Wight on this day in British history, 21 July 1545. The French invasion was repelled at heavy cost to the British militia raised to defend the island. This occasion was the last time that France attempted to attack the Isle of Wight.

explore-blog:

The little-known art of Zelda Fitzgerald – pictured here, her painting of springtime at Washington Square Park.

Reblogged from npr

explore-blog:

The little-known art of Zelda Fitzgerald – pictured here, her painting of springtime at Washington Square Park.

Reblogged from talesofthedragonslayer

demons:

The 369th Infantry marching down Fifth Avenue in honor of their return, Feb 1919

The 369th were known as the Harlem Hellfighters (and sometimes as the Black Ratters) and was an infantry regiment formed completely of African Americans and African Puerto Ricans. During the Great War, the men of the 369th spent the longest time at the front, earning the respect of the French soldiers they fought beside earning them their name Hellfighter because they never lost a man to capture, nor losing a trench or a foot of ground to the Germans. 

The parade thrown for their return in February 1919 began on Fifth Avenue at 61st Street, and proceeded uptown past ranks of white bystanders before turning west on 110th Street, and then swung onto Lenox Avenue to march into Harlem, where black New Yorkers packed the sidewalks for a glimpse of the men.

(Source: Flickr / usnationalarchives)

All OUP Online Resources are free April 13-19th

Reblogged from mediumaevum

mediumaevum:

Username: libraryweek

Password: libraryweek

Easy as that! Spread the word and share free knowledge.

medievalpoc:

skemono submitted to medievalpoc:
I was planning on submitting something different today, but with the recent mention of Les Mis and the French Revolution, this seemed more timely.
There were many black people in France around the time of the French Revolution—in fact, a census was taken a little earlier, in 1777-1778, counting the black population. The number reported in 1782 was 4-5 thousand, which admittedly was a small fraction of France’s population of 26 million. Whatever the case, there were many black people all throughout France. From The Negro in France:

These reports from the intendants were made out by city and town, so that it is possible to ascertain with relative precision the geographical distribution of Negroes in France. As already stated, they were most densely settled at Paris, and after it in the seaports, especially those of the west coast, like Bordeaux and Nantes. Yet even in the mountains of Burgundy and the Pyrenees were to be found a few stragglers.

These people came in all social groups. Although France supposedly did not permit slavery at the time, slaveowners from the Caribbean colonies were allowed to bring their slaves with them, or send them to France for training. (Though even the slaves were not without their options: a few successfully sued for their freedom, as in the 1762 case Lestaing vs Hutteau; some were manumitted; some escaped and could not be caught.) Many were poor, though some were rich, such as the wealthy free people of color in the colonies, who would visit France. Quoth Africa in Europe:

[A] man of color named Carstaing was elected to the National Convention from a constituency in metropolitan France in December 1793 to replace another deputy who had been executed. Of note, Carstaing was married to the comtesse Françoise de Beauharnais, the daughter of Claude de Beauharnais, comte des Roches-Baritaud and Anne-Maried Mouchard. Through the first marriage of Carstaing’s wife to comte François de Beauharnais, she was the sister-in-law of Alexandre François Marie, vicomte de Beauharnais, who had fought both during the American and French Revolutions as well as the first husband of Joséphine de Beauharnais, who later married Napoleon Bonaparte and, as a consequence, became the Empress of the French in 1804. Hortense de Beauharnais, who was the half-sister of Carstaing’s wife, was also the mother of France’s Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, who after becoming the President of the first President [sic] of the French Republic in 1848 became Emperor Napoleon III of the French in 1852.

There were many servants of French aristocrats and nobles, who through their service could have good food, fancy clothes, even an education. The above is a portrait of Louis-Benoit Zamor, who as a child was kidnapped and sold to Louis XV, who gave him to his mistress, Jeanne Bécu, comtesse du Barry. Zamor was educated and well-read, enjoying the works of Rousseau. During the Revolution he joined the Jacobins and worked for the Committee of Public Safety, where he helped to have the Comtesse du Barry arrested, tried, and executed. At the trial, he stated he was born in Chittagong, Bangladesh, though the Comtesse was always under the impression he was African.
Afterward, he was arrested by one of the other factions of the Revolution for a few weeks, and after some friends got him released, he appears to have left France for some years. In 1815 he owned a house in Paris and was working as a teacher before his death in 1820.
None of this should be taken to mean that there was no racism in France, of course. In fact, the above-mentioned census was taken because of the 1777 Déclaration pour la police des noirs, which stated

that Negroes had become too numerous in French cities, and especially in Paris, that they were “the cause of the greatest disorders,” and that they returned to the colonies with a “spirit of independence and insubordination” that rendered them “more harmful than useful.” It was therefore provided that thenceforth no “Negroes, mulattoes, or other men of color” might be taken into France, whether male or female, free or slave, on penalty of a fine of 3,000 livres” (The Negro in France, p. 49).

Also,

The law required all blacks and people of color, whether free or slave, to register with an office of the Admiralty. Those with prior residence could stay in the country, but they were forbidden from marrying whites. In addition, they were ordered to carry cartouche or identification papers. (Chatman, “‘There Are No Slaves in France’: A Re-Examination of Slave Laws in Eighteenth Century France”, pp. 148-9)

[X] [X] [X] [X]

Reblogged from frenchhistory

medievalpoc:

skemono submitted to medievalpoc:

I was planning on submitting something different today, but with the recent mention of Les Mis and the French Revolution, this seemed more timely.

There were many black people in France around the time of the French Revolution—in fact, a census was taken a little earlier, in 1777-1778, counting the black population. The number reported in 1782 was 4-5 thousand, which admittedly was a small fraction of France’s population of 26 million. Whatever the case, there were many black people all throughout France. From The Negro in France:

These reports from the intendants were made out by city and town, so that it is possible to ascertain with relative precision the geographical distribution of Negroes in France. As already stated, they were most densely settled at Paris, and after it in the seaports, especially those of the west coast, like Bordeaux and Nantes. Yet even in the mountains of Burgundy and the Pyrenees were to be found a few stragglers.

These people came in all social groups. Although France supposedly did not permit slavery at the time, slaveowners from the Caribbean colonies were allowed to bring their slaves with them, or send them to France for training. (Though even the slaves were not without their options: a few successfully sued for their freedom, as in the 1762 case Lestaing vs Hutteau; some were manumitted; some escaped and could not be caught.) Many were poor, though some were rich, such as the wealthy free people of color in the colonies, who would visit France. Quoth Africa in Europe:

[A] man of color named Carstaing was elected to the National Convention from a constituency in metropolitan France in December 1793 to replace another deputy who had been executed. Of note, Carstaing was married to the comtesse Françoise de Beauharnais, the daughter of Claude de Beauharnais, comte des Roches-Baritaud and Anne-Maried Mouchard. Through the first marriage of Carstaing’s wife to comte François de Beauharnais, she was the sister-in-law of Alexandre François Marie, vicomte de Beauharnais, who had fought both during the American and French Revolutions as well as the first husband of Joséphine de Beauharnais, who later married Napoleon Bonaparte and, as a consequence, became the Empress of the French in 1804. Hortense de Beauharnais, who was the half-sister of Carstaing’s wife, was also the mother of France’s Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, who after becoming the President of the first President [sic] of the French Republic in 1848 became Emperor Napoleon III of the French in 1852.

There were many servants of French aristocrats and nobles, who through their service could have good food, fancy clothes, even an education. The above is a portrait of Louis-Benoit Zamor, who as a child was kidnapped and sold to Louis XV, who gave him to his mistress, Jeanne Bécu, comtesse du Barry. Zamor was educated and well-read, enjoying the works of Rousseau. During the Revolution he joined the Jacobins and worked for the Committee of Public Safety, where he helped to have the Comtesse du Barry arrested, tried, and executed. At the trial, he stated he was born in Chittagong, Bangladesh, though the Comtesse was always under the impression he was African.

Afterward, he was arrested by one of the other factions of the Revolution for a few weeks, and after some friends got him released, he appears to have left France for some years. In 1815 he owned a house in Paris and was working as a teacher before his death in 1820.

None of this should be taken to mean that there was no racism in France, of course. In fact, the above-mentioned census was taken because of the 1777 Déclaration pour la police des noirs, which stated

that Negroes had become too numerous in French cities, and especially in Paris, that they were “the cause of the greatest disorders,” and that they returned to the colonies with a “spirit of independence and insubordination” that rendered them “more harmful than useful.” It was therefore provided that thenceforth no “Negroes, mulattoes, or other men of color” might be taken into France, whether male or female, free or slave, on penalty of a fine of 3,000 livres” (The Negro in France, p. 49).

Also,

The law required all blacks and people of color, whether free or slave, to register with an office of the Admiralty. Those with prior residence could stay in the country, but they were forbidden from marrying whites. In addition, they were ordered to carry cartouche or identification papers. (Chatman, “‘There Are No Slaves in France’: A Re-Examination of Slave Laws in Eighteenth Century France”, pp. 148-9)

[X] [X] [X] [X]

demons:

NYC celebrating upon the announcement the Armistice/11 Nov 1918

Reblogged from demons

demons:

NYC celebrating upon the announcement the Armistice/11 Nov 1918

jtotheizzoe:

Are These Cave Paintings The First Animations?
Over at Nautilus, Zach Zorich illuminates how 21,000 year-old cave paintings at Lascaux may represent an early form of motion picture.
Many of the superimposed animal shapes, like the deer heads above (photo by Norbert Aujoulet), can appear to move like a flip-book when they are viewed with the dim, flickering light sources that would have been available to Paleolithic humans. Combine it with some low-light trickery on behalf of the visual system, and you’ve got cave-toons:

Physiologically, our eyes undergo a switch when we slip into darkness. In bright light, eyes primarily rely on the color-sensitive cells in our retinas called cones, but in low light the cones don’t have enough photons to work with and cells that sense black and white gradients, called rods, take over. That’s why in low light, colors fade, shadows become harder to distinguish from actual objects, and the soft boundaries between things disappear. Images straight ahead of us look out of focus, as if they were seen in our peripheral vision. The end result for early humans who viewed cave paintings by firelight might have been that a deer with multiple heads, for example, resembled a single, animated beast.

Storytelling, visual or otherwise, is simply part of what makes human.
Previously: Archaeologist Marc Azema has found similar story-paintings at Chauvet, even older than Lascaux!
(via Nautilus)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

Are These Cave Paintings The First Animations?

Over at Nautilus, Zach Zorich illuminates how 21,000 year-old cave paintings at Lascaux may represent an early form of motion picture.

Many of the superimposed animal shapes, like the deer heads above (photo by Norbert Aujoulet), can appear to move like a flip-book when they are viewed with the dim, flickering light sources that would have been available to Paleolithic humans. Combine it with some low-light trickery on behalf of the visual system, and you’ve got cave-toons:

Physiologically, our eyes undergo a switch when we slip into darkness. In bright light, eyes primarily rely on the color-sensitive cells in our retinas called cones, but in low light the cones don’t have enough photons to work with and cells that sense black and white gradients, called rods, take over. That’s why in low light, colors fade, shadows become harder to distinguish from actual objects, and the soft boundaries between things disappear. Images straight ahead of us look out of focus, as if they were seen in our peripheral vision. The end result for early humans who viewed cave paintings by firelight might have been that a deer with multiple heads, for example, resembled a single, animated beast.

Storytelling, visual or otherwise, is simply part of what makes human.

Previously: Archaeologist Marc Azema has found similar story-paintings at Chauvet, even older than Lascaux!

(via Nautilus)