Awesome Things From History

Awesome Things From History Because I am obsessed with history and have way too much time on my hands.

Reblogged from omgthatdress

handsometuesday:

Dr. Mary Walker ”believed that tight corsets along with voluminous skirts and petticoats were unsanitary and hampered her medical practice. So she didn’t wear them: first sporting bloomers, then, midway through the war, abandoning those for a male surgeon’s uniform. She didn’t attempt to pass as a man; she was an obviously female doctor wearing a male uniform…. She continued to wear men’s clothing throughout her long life (she lived until 1919) and continually advocated for rational dress reform for women.”

Reblogged from npr

npr:

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Marking the 450th Anniversary of William Shakespeare’s Birth

For more photos from the sites of William’s Shakespeare life, explore the Shakespeare’s Birthplace, Globe Theater and Shakespeare’s Grave location pages.

Every year at the end of April, a celebration of the life and works of the great playwright William Shakespeare takes place in the market town of Stratford-upon-Avon, England. Shakespeare was born there in 1564 and cultural celebrations in Stratford’s streets, with entertainers, street performers and traditional Morris dancers, go back hundreds of years.

From his plays to his sonnets, Shakespeare’s extensive works have produced a legacy of characters, ideas, histories and, of course, words—it is thought he contributed more than 2,000 to the English language. His plays are a staple on many school curriculums, and continue to be reinterpreted on stage, rewritten in fiction and retold on screen.

The man himself is still very much a mystery and few details exist about his private life. Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway with whom he bore three children, before relocating to London to pursue his acting and writing career. He died at the age of 52 on April 23, 1616—a date which fell very near to his birthday in the same month (the exact date is unknown).

This year marks the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth and, on Saturday, a special procession will take place in Stratford, ending with celebrants laying flowers on Shakespeare’s grave in the Holy Trinity Church. The world-renowned Royal Shakespeare Company will also host a full program of shows.

Happy birthday, Shakespeare! Read what the Globe Theater has in store to celebrate

usnatarchives:

Beginning in the 1950s, the U.S. Government used jazz as a diplomatic tool during the Cold War. John Edward Hasse—author, curator, biographer of Duke Ellington and founder of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra—leads a discussion focusing on efforts by the United States Information Agency, the Voice of America, and the U.S. Department of State. Panelists include Former Ambassador David T. Killion, who organized International Jazz Day for UNESCO; David Ensor, current Director of the Voice of America; and historian Penny Von Eschen, author of Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War.
Join us on Thursday, April 24, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
This is the first in a series of programs, Jazz at the National Archives, made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Reblogged from usnatarchives

usnatarchives:

Beginning in the 1950s, the U.S. Government used jazz as a diplomatic tool during the Cold War. John Edward Hasse—author, curator, biographer of Duke Ellington and founder of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra—leads a discussion focusing on efforts by the United States Information Agency, the Voice of America, and the U.S. Department of State. Panelists include Former Ambassador David T. Killion, who organized International Jazz Day for UNESCO; David Ensor, current Director of the Voice of America; and historian Penny Von Eschen, author of Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War.

Join us on Thursday, April 24, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

This is the first in a series of programs, Jazz at the National Archives, made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

mapsontheweb:

Map of Roman Britain (150 AD)

Reblogged from hellotailor

mapsontheweb:

Map of Roman Britain (150 AD)

(Source: Wikipedia)

usnatarchives:

Monday will be an eggs-ellent day in Washington, DC, for young people! It’s the annual White House Easter Egg Roll, where hundreds of children gather to roll eggs and play games on the South Lawn of the President’s House.
But the tradition did not start at the White House. It began on the lawns and terraces of the Capitol after the Civil War. Children of all races and backgrounds rolled eggs and played games on the turf around the Capitol.
But in 1878, children who arrived at the Capitol on Easter Monday were turned away.
Congress had passed a law to prevent these young citizens from taking such liberties on the grounds, and it became the “duty of the Capitol police hereafter to prevent any portion of the Capitol grounds and terraces from being used as playgrounds or otherwise.”
It’s not clear how the party was rolled over to the White House, but a newspaper clipping in Rutherford B. Hayes’s personal scrapbook shows he was the first President to officially allow the Executive Mansion to be used for egg rolling. (There were informal egg rollings there as early as Lincoln’s administration.)
The good times and egg rolling continued through the following Presidential administrations with a few brief interruptions. In 1917, during World War I, the egg roll was canceled until 1920 because of concerns of the waste of food.
War took a toll again in 1946, when Harry Truman discouraged the egg roll in the face of the millions left devasted and starving by World War II. The egg roll did not return until President Eisenhower revived it in 1953.
It’s been rolling along ever since! Here’s some fun facts from our favorite egg-centric Prologue article:

Reblogged from usnatarchives

usnatarchives:

Monday will be an eggs-ellent day in Washington, DC, for young people! It’s the annual White House Easter Egg Roll, where hundreds of children gather to roll eggs and play games on the South Lawn of the President’s House.

But the tradition did not start at the White House. It began on the lawns and terraces of the Capitol after the Civil War. Children of all races and backgrounds rolled eggs and played games on the turf around the Capitol.

But in 1878, children who arrived at the Capitol on Easter Monday were turned away.

Congress had passed a law to prevent these young citizens from taking such liberties on the grounds, and it became the “duty of the Capitol police hereafter to prevent any portion of the Capitol grounds and terraces from being used as playgrounds or otherwise.”

It’s not clear how the party was rolled over to the White House, but a newspaper clipping in Rutherford B. Hayes’s personal scrapbook shows he was the first President to officially allow the Executive Mansion to be used for egg rolling. (There were informal egg rollings there as early as Lincoln’s administration.)

The good times and egg rolling continued through the following Presidential administrations with a few brief interruptions. In 1917, during World War I, the egg roll was canceled until 1920 because of concerns of the waste of food.

War took a toll again in 1946, when Harry Truman discouraged the egg roll in the face of the millions left devasted and starving by World War II. The egg roll did not return until President Eisenhower revived it in 1953.

It’s been rolling along ever since! Here’s some fun facts from our favorite egg-centric Prologue article:

japaneseaesthetics:

Two Gallinules and Lotus Leaves in Shallow Water in the Rain.  Woodblock print, 20th century, Japan, by artist Soseki. 
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of C. Adrian Rübel
, 1978.417

Reblogged from asianhistory

japaneseaesthetics:

Two Gallinules and Lotus Leaves in Shallow Water in the Rain.  Woodblock print, 20th century, Japan, by artist Soseki. 

Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of C. Adrian Rübel

, 1978.417

(Source: harvardartmuseums.org)

"He really had been through death, but he had returned because he could not bear the solitude."

Reblogged from mediumaevum

 Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez (1927-2014)One Hundred Years of Solitude (via mediumaevum)

mediumaevum:

Beginning at sundown on April 14, many Jews observed Passover at a Seder, the special meal that commemorates their ancestors’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the haggadah. The Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is kept, is a rare, beautifully illustrated manuscript created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its own story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus.
Watch the PBS documentary on this extraordinary manuscript, a survivor of the 1492 expulsion of the Jews from Spain, two world wars, and the four-year seige of the city of Sarajevo (1992-1996).

Reblogged from mediumaevum

mediumaevum:

Beginning at sundown on April 14, many Jews observed Passover at a Seder, the special meal that commemorates their ancestors’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the haggadah. The Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is kept, is a rare, beautifully illustrated manuscript created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its own story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus.

Watch the PBS documentary on this extraordinary manuscript, a survivor of the 1492 expulsion of the Jews from Spain, two world wars, and the four-year seige of the city of Sarajevo (1992-1996).

british-history:

An armed contingent of French forces attempted to invade the Isle of Wight on this day in British history, 21 July 1545. The French invasion was repelled at heavy cost to the British militia raised to defend the island. This occasion was the last time that France attempted to attack the Isle of Wight.

Reblogged from frenchhistory

british-history:

An armed contingent of French forces attempted to invade the Isle of Wight on this day in British history, 21 July 1545. The French invasion was repelled at heavy cost to the British militia raised to defend the island. This occasion was the last time that France attempted to attack the Isle of Wight.

explore-blog:

The little-known art of Zelda Fitzgerald – pictured here, her painting of springtime at Washington Square Park.

Reblogged from npr

explore-blog:

The little-known art of Zelda Fitzgerald – pictured here, her painting of springtime at Washington Square Park.