Awesome Things From History

Awesome Things From History Because I am obsessed with history and have way too much time on my hands.

usnatarchives:

This photo is titled “Riveter at Lockheed Aircraft Corp., Burbank, CA”. The women pictured is donning a headscarf, similar to the one cultural icon “Rosie the Riveter” wears. “Rosie the Riveter” became a powerful symbol of feminism for women working in factories producing munitions and war supplies. National Archives Identifier: 522880

Reblogged from usnatarchives

usnatarchives:

This photo is titled “Riveter at Lockheed Aircraft Corp., Burbank, CA”. The women pictured is donning a headscarf, similar to the one cultural icon “Rosie the Riveter” wears. “Rosie the Riveter” became a powerful symbol of feminism for women working in factories producing munitions and war supplies. National Archives Identifier: 522880

demons:

Aussies feeding the ducks/Pas-de-Calais, June 1916

Reblogged from demons

demons:

Aussies feeding the ducks/Pas-de-Calais, June 1916

smithsonian:


“I thought your cover picture was really marvelous,” Kennedy wrote the artist after the work appeared on Time, “but I don’t have red spots all over my face.”

Roy Lichtenstein, famous for his comic book-style pop art, created very few portraits. Our National Portrait Gallery writes about this rare commission from Time Magazine and the process the artist used to create it.
(via National Portrait Gallery | Face to Face blog: Time Magazine: RFK by Roy Lichtenstein)

Reblogged from smithsonian

smithsonian:

“I thought your cover picture was really marvelous,” Kennedy wrote the artist after the work appeared on Time, “but I don’t have red spots all over my face.”

Roy Lichtenstein, famous for his comic book-style pop art, created very few portraits. Our National Portrait Gallery writes about this rare commission from Time Magazine and the process the artist used to create it.

(via National Portrait Gallery | Face to Face blog: Time Magazine: RFK by Roy Lichtenstein)

mediumaevum:

Three Teutonic battle axes from the late Middle Ages have been found by engineers who remove World War II artillery shells left the forests in the Forest District Wipsowo (Poland). Historic weapons will be donated to a museum.
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Photo: PAP 2014 / Tomasz Waszczuk

Reblogged from mediumaevum

mediumaevum:

Three Teutonic battle axes from the late Middle Ages have been found by engineers who remove World War II artillery shells left the forests in the Forest District Wipsowo (Poland). Historic weapons will be donated to a museum.

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Photo: PAP 2014 / Tomasz Waszczuk

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

This 1911 photo of Marie Curie in a roomful of dudes (including Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, Ernest Rutherford, and young Albert Einstein, lurking in the background, second from right) bespeaks so much both about the gendered state of science and about the enormity of cultural bias Curie overcame to become the “Martyr of Science,” the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the only person to date to win a Nobel in two different sciences.
Also see Curie on science and wonder. 

It’s amazing that they even let her in the room at the first Solvay Conference considering that facial hair was apparently required for entry (except for you, James Hopwood Jeans, you somehow made it in naked-faced and wearing gray)
As a scientist, Marie Curie experienced incredible anti-female prejudice , and although we still have a lot of progress yet to make, let’s be thankful for people like her for opening some of the first doors for women in science.
It must have been exhausting work. I mean, just look at her, sitting next to Poincaré, head in hand like “Why do I even bother, Henri?”
I can almost picture Marie as a child…

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

This 1911 photo of Marie Curie in a roomful of dudes (including Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, Ernest Rutherford, and young Albert Einstein, lurking in the background, second from right) bespeaks so much both about the gendered state of science and about the enormity of cultural bias Curie overcame to become the “Martyr of Science,” the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the only person to date to win a Nobel in two different sciences.

Also see Curie on science and wonder

It’s amazing that they even let her in the room at the first Solvay Conference considering that facial hair was apparently required for entry (except for you, James Hopwood Jeans, you somehow made it in naked-faced and wearing gray)

As a scientist, Marie Curie experienced incredible anti-female prejudice , and although we still have a lot of progress yet to make, let’s be thankful for people like her for opening some of the first doors for women in science.

It must have been exhausting work. I mean, just look at her, sitting next to Poincaré, head in hand like “Why do I even bother, Henri?

I can almost picture Marie as a child…

usnatarchives:

Style and Influence: First Ladies’ Fashions
From the first days on a campaign trail to the final days living in the White House, the First Ladies of the United States have attracted attention in numerous ways. Both historic and modern First Ladies have harnessed the power of fashion to build identity and inform Americans. In conjunction with our exhibition “Making Their Mark,” we present a distinguished panel to discuss and examine the fashions of America’s First Ladies through conversation and photos. Moderated by Tim Gunn, star of Project Runway, panelists include Valerie Steele, Director and Chief Curator, the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology; Lisa Kathleen Graddy, Deputy Chair and Chief Curator of Political History and the First Ladies Collection, Smithsonian National Museum of American History; and Tracy Reese, a fashion designer who has designed for First Lady Michelle Obama. Presented in partnership with the White House Historical Association.
Tuesday, September 30, at 7 p.m. in the William G. McGowan TheaterThe discussion will be streamed live on YouTube.

Reblogged from usnatarchives

usnatarchives:

Style and Influence: First Ladies’ Fashions

From the first days on a campaign trail to the final days living in the White House, the First Ladies of the United States have attracted attention in numerous ways. Both historic and modern First Ladies have harnessed the power of fashion to build identity and inform Americans. In conjunction with our exhibition “Making Their Mark,” we present a distinguished panel to discuss and examine the fashions of America’s First Ladies through conversation and photos. Moderated by Tim Gunn, star of Project Runway, panelists include Valerie Steele, Director and Chief Curator, the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology; Lisa Kathleen Graddy, Deputy Chair and Chief Curator of Political History and the First Ladies Collection, Smithsonian National Museum of American History; and Tracy Reese, a fashion designer who has designed for First Lady Michelle Obama. Presented in partnership with the White House Historical Association.

Tuesday, September 30, at 7 p.m. in the William G. McGowan Theater

The discussion will be streamed live on YouTube.

beatonna:

Ahh, more of the Miserable Father images from suffragette times. It’s a favourite old meme because imagine caring for your children?  noooooo not my childreeennnn

Reblogged from beatonna

beatonna:

Ahh, more of the Miserable Father images from suffragette times. It’s a favourite old meme because imagine caring for your children?  noooooo not my childreeennnn

npr:

World War I left many soldiers with disfiguring scars. So American artist Anna Coleman Ladd set up her own studio in Paris and set to work sculpting new faces for those who had lost a piece of theirs in trench warfare.
Ladd started by getting to know the men: their quirks, daily habits, what their siblings looked like, the limited facial expressions they were still capable of. Then, she would choose an expression. For some, that expression would be the only one they could wear.
The Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art has just posted a collection of Ladd’s papers online — photos, letters, diaries and other texts documenting her work.
One Sculptor’s Answer To WWI Wounds: Plaster, Copper And Paint
Photo: American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution

Reblogged from npr

npr:

World War I left many soldiers with disfiguring scars. So American artist Anna Coleman Ladd set up her own studio in Paris and set to work sculpting new faces for those who had lost a piece of theirs in trench warfare.

Ladd started by getting to know the men: their quirks, daily habits, what their siblings looked like, the limited facial expressions they were still capable of. Then, she would choose an expression. For some, that expression would be the only one they could wear.

The Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art has just posted a collection of Ladd’s papers online — photos, letters, diaries and other texts documenting her work.

One Sculptor’s Answer To WWI Wounds: Plaster, Copper And Paint

Photo: American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution

Reblogged from wilwheaton

npr:

Imagine if you could see the pen Beethoven used to write his Symphony No. 5. Or the chisel Michelangelo used to sculpt his David. Art lovers find endless fascination in the materials of artists — a pen, a brush, even a rag can become sacred objects, humanizing a work of art.

And now, at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art, visitors can see some of the materials that impressionist Mary Cassatt once used — three well-loved, large wooden boxes of pastels from distinguished Paris art supply stores. Each box is filled with stubby pieces of pastels, some worn down to half an inch, others almost untouched.

Now That’s An Artifact: See Mary Cassatt’s Pastels At The National Gallery

Photo credit: National Gallery of Art

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